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Pet Poison Helpline

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012
Poison Prevention Week: Know Your Poisons

Poison Prevention Week is March 18-24 , a good time to check around the house for items that might hurt your pet(s). The Pet Poison Helpline website (@PetPoisonHelp on Twitter) is a great resource and yielded these Top Ten Lists.

The Pet Poison Helpline fields emergency calls from both pet guardians and veterinarians in the U.S., Canada and the Caribbean. While the service charges a small fee ($39 U.S.), they have veterinary poison specialists on hand all the time. The information on the website is free.

If your dog or cat eats something poisonous call your veterinarian or the Pet Poison Helpline immediately! The sooner a dog poisoning or cat poisoning is diagnosed, the easier, less expensive, and safer it is to treat your pet.

The Top Ten Dog Poisons

  • Chocolate
  • Insect bait stations
  • Mouse and rat poison
  • Fertilizers (even compost)
  • Xylitol-containing products (i.e., sugar-free gums and candies)
  • Ibuprofen (Advil® or Motrin® in brand name or generic form)
  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol® in brand name or generic form)
  • Silica gel packs
  • Amphetamines (such as ADD/ADHD drugs)
  • Household cleaners

The Top Ten Cat Poisons

  • Lilies
  • Topical flea and tick medicine designed for dogs only
  • Household cleaners
  • Mouse and rat poison
  • Paints and varnishes
  • Veterinary non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (Rimadyl®, Deramaxx®)
  • Glow sticks/glow jewelry
  • Amphetamines (such as ADD/ADHD drugs)
  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol® in brand name or generic form)
  • Ibuprofen (Advil® or Motrin® in brand name or generic form)

Pet Poison Prevention Week

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

March 18-24 is National Poison Prevention Week. Much about poison prevention is aimed at parents with small children, but don’t for­get your pets. Household pets are naturally curious and often can’t resist smelling or tasting items in the home or yard. Knowing which household and garden items are particularly dangerous to pets can go a long way to ensuring their safety. Here are a few tips:

  • Tidy up your living room. Many things commonly associated with your main living space can poison pets like toxic house plants, potpourri or other frangrance products, chewing gum, or smoke cessation gums.
  • Keep your kitchen garbage can shut with a tight fitting lid or hidden in the pantry. Many human foods like raisins, chocolate, or alcohol are poisonous to pets. Dogs may also try to dig discarded meat bones or raw meat packaging out of the garbage.
  • In the bathroom, keep all medications out of reach. Also, never try to treat your pet with human pain killers as some common human pain killers like acetomenaphin are extremely toxic to pets. In addition, keep all bathroom cleaners locked away. If licked or swallowed, they can cause severe chemical burns.
  • In your yard and garden, keep pets away from areas that have been sprayed with herbicides until dry. Also keep dogs away from fertilizers and other pest control agents. Some that contain blood meal or bone meal can be tasty to dogs.

For more information and tips on keeping your pets safe, visit www.petpoisonhelpline.com.

SOURCE Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical Association (PVMA)